Is Suicide Prevention Australia genuine about preventing suicide?

Today is World Suicide Prevention Day.  A lot of people are seriously trying to save a lot of people’s lives.  On the surface this looks like a genuine effort, and for the most part it is, but look a little deeper and not everything is as rosy as you’d like to think.

Suicide Prevention Australia endorses the Salvation Army in their attempts to curb suicide.  Yet the Salvation Army does not believe homosexuality is acceptable.  In fact the Salvation Army does not even acknowledge same-sex attracted people as an at-risk group on their Suicide Prevention Resources & Information page, despite rates of suicide amongst same-sex attracted youth currently reaching alarming levels.

Read my recent and unanswered letter to Ryan McGlaughlin, CEO of Suicide Prevention Australia.  I urge you to write to him as well and ask him the same questions as I do.  Why does SPA continue to endorse the Salvation Army, an organisation with homophobic attitudes that are harmful to same-sex attracted youth?  Why is Suicide Prevention Australia staying silent on this matter?

SPA need to speak out loudly against the Salvation Army and any other organisation that is intolerant of homosexuality.  Until then they can’t be seen to be serious about preventing suicide.

Advertisements

2 Responses to Is Suicide Prevention Australia genuine about preventing suicide?

  1. Greg Adkins says:

    Hi Michael,

    I read your blog and have been left a little confused however I’m hoping you can help me along a little.

    Are you questioning if the Salvation Army are genuine in their attempts to curb suicide and then if Suicide Prevention Australia are disingenuous by association because of this? Are you saying that by the Salvation Army not acknowledging same-sex attracted people as an at-risk group on their Suicide Prevention Resources & Information page, they are not concerned or acting for people at-risk who are not same-sex attracted or would not be concerned or would not act appropriately should an at-risk same-sex attracted person arrive on their doorstep, even of their action would only be to engage another service better able to address the person’s needs?

    I’m trying to make out the point of your argument while being very aware that most of the same-sex attracted people I have ever come in contact with would be seeking alternatives to the Salvation Army as a source of information about same-sex attraction or gender diversity, or perhaps even suicide ideation when the individual identifies as such.

    I’m interested to know how any service handles people presenting that are not aligned with their core target group and the speed with which they make an appropriate referral.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: